• Feature Article

    At an angle to the universe: Remembering Brian Doyle

    3 Comments
    Gillian Bouras |  Brian's work was notable for its firm yet subtle control, the great tumbling yet disciplined lists of adjectives, the elevation of the quotidian, the appreciation of the natural world and its creatures, the sheer love of life. Re-reading one recent piece I find the references to the 'lovely bride' and 'the house wolf' almost unbearably touching. One reader wrote he was not initiated into Brian's 'grand mysteries', but that the joy and awe conveyed rang out with love and goodwill. How very true.
  • Feature Article

    Say it like you mean it

    3 Comments
    Fiona Katauskas |  This week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.
  • Feature Article

    Pay fierce attention to the holy of everything

    4 Comments
    Brian Doyle |  We talk about how there are all sorts of illuminated beings in every sort of context, and how some beings serve their fellows by being great listeners, and others have healing hands, and others are good at getting everyone to come to a disgruntled agreement, and how some are lucky to discover that their skill, their gift, the thing they love to do and do really well, is to pay fierce attention to the holy of everything, to notice the flourish and song of holy and the awful of bruised and broken holy, and report on this to their brothers and sisters, which is, of course, everyone.
  • Feature Article

    Building social justice through shareholder advocacy

    3 Comments
    Ann Deslandes |  Wealth inequality in Australia is flourishing. The top one per cent of household wealth in Australia is moving toward being 20 per cent of total wealth, and the country is a preferred destination for millionaires. With a government that prefers to impoverish and vilify the disadvantaged and spend big on coal mines, this does not look likely to shift. But there are always other paths to social justice, and in Australia one may be through the millionaires - or at least the companies on which their fortunes are built.
  • At an angle to the universe: Remembering Brian Doyle

    3 Comments
    Gillian Bouras | 30 May 2017

    Brian DoyleBrian's work was notable for its firm yet subtle control, the great tumbling yet disciplined lists of adjectives, the elevation of the quotidian, the appreciation of the natural world and its creatures, the sheer love of life. Re-reading one recent piece I find the references to the 'lovely bride' and 'the house wolf' almost unbearably touching. One reader wrote he was not initiated into Brian's 'grand mysteries', but that the joy and awe conveyed rang out with love and goodwill. How very true.

  • Pay fierce attention to the holy of everything

    4 Comments
    Brian Doyle | 29 May 2017

    Baby examining leaves and grassWe talk about how there are all sorts of illuminated beings in every sort of context, and how some beings serve their fellows by being great listeners, and others have healing hands, and others are good at getting everyone to come to a disgruntled agreement, and how some are lucky to discover that their skill, their gift, the thing they love to do and do really well, is to pay fierce attention to the holy of everything, to notice the flourish and song of holy and the awful of bruised and broken holy, and report on this to their brothers and sisters, which is, of course, everyone.

  • Muslim feminists have their work cut out for them

    7 Comments
    Rachel Woodlock | 29 May 2017

    t-shirt This is what a Muslim feminist looks likeI used to have a t-shirt that read 'this is what a radical Muslim feminist looks like' and I got my fair share of raised eyebrows and challenging questions. The most obvious group that thinks Muslim feminism is oxymoronic are those who we've started to call the 'alt-right'. This group salivates over images of burqa-clad Muslim women scuttling in fear from their bearded oppressors. It is not that they want to free Muslim women so much as it is they don't want the Brown Man ruling.

  • Ramadan: the fast and the flatulent

    9 Comments
    Irfan Yusuf | 29 May 2017

    Ramadan prayerYou need not believe everything you read in the Herald Sun or an ISIS press release. Islam isn't just about armed jihad and violence against infant genitalia. Islam does have a spiritual side, and Ramadan is inherently spiritual, full of prayer and fasting and hardly any horizontal bedtime action. The theory behind all this deprivation is that if you're hungry and thirsty and sex-deprived between sunrise and sunset for an entire month, you'll gain a spiritual high that should last you the rest of the year.

  • Finding my grandfather

    1 Comment
    Wally Swist | 29 May 2017

    DNA strandThere is the photograph of my father's father in military uniform, an Austrian, serving in the Polish cavalry in WWI, standing ramrod straight. It is he whom I think of when I find myself dowsing my genome for answers regarding my origin, the deep pull that draws me to the late symphonies of Mozart, Rilke's angelic mysticism, and, as a child, to Krapfen and Apfelstrudel ... That grandfather died shortly after returning to his farm from the results of having been a victim of a mustard gas attack in the war.

  • Building social justice through shareholder advocacy

    3 Comments
    Ann Deslandes | 26 May 2017

    Concerned citizens build a 'voting bloc' out of the shares of wealthy companies. Cartoon by Chris JohnstonWealth inequality in Australia is flourishing. The top one per cent of household wealth in Australia is moving toward being 20 per cent of total wealth, and the country is a preferred destination for millionaires. With a government that prefers to impoverish and vilify the disadvantaged and spend big on coal mines, this does not look likely to shift. But there are always other paths to social justice, and in Australia one may be through the millionaires - or at least the companies on which their fortunes are built.

  • Getting off gas not so easy for renters

    2 Comments
    Greg Foyster | 26 May 2017

    Gas burnerStandard electric heaters turn roughly one unit of electricity into one unit of heat. A reverse cycle air conditioner, however, uses electricity to 'pump' heat from one place to another and is incredibly efficient. Using electricity from the grid creates more pollution than burning gas, but the electric reverse cycle air conditioner is so efficient it's still less damaging overall. That's great news for households with air con, but galling for anyone who can't afford one, or isn't allowed to install it.

  • Don't turn away from dire child abuse stats

    4 Comments
    Barry Gittins | 25 May 2017

    Child on wet footpathAustralian kids are being bashed, raped, starved, scorned and otherwise treated with no dignity or kindness. The study states it is not simply a case of one-off abuse, noting that 'research has demonstrated that maltreatment sub-types seldom occur in isolation (e.g. sexual abuse is often accompanied by psychological maltreatment or physical abuse)'. That is difficult reading. It makes me sick to write it. But the paper should, in a just society, serve as a catalyst for a national conversation.

  • Preserving and pillaging privacy

    6 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 25 May 2017

    Padlock computer keyIn each of us is a personal centre able to reflect, to wonder, to explore the world and to evaluate it, to long and to love, to make decisions, and to engage freely with other human beings. Privacy is the gate that allows us to leave and others to enter the garden of our deepest selves. If it is torn off its hinges we shall live on a shallow level, preoccupied with defending ourselves. That is why the invasion of our privacy by governments and corporations in order to control our lives is unjustifiable.


Featured Writers

  • Catherine Marshall

    Catherine Marshall headshot

    "For the traveller, these ever tighter-restrictions have already turned a commonplace activity into one riddled with fear and mistrust."
     read more

     

  • Greg Foyster

    Greg Foyster headshot

    "It's another example of how clean, green and efficient technologies still aren't accessible to everyone. This is a massive injustice in the making."
     read more

     

  • Kate Galloway

    Kate Galloway

    "It only took a few paragraphs in this article for the miraculous, life-saving device to become a futuristic dystopian tool of oppression."
     read more

     

  • Tseen Khoo

    Tseen Khoo

    "I have never felt as uneasy in Australia as I do now."
     read more

     

  • S01E08: Comey dismissal and the Australian federal budget

    Podcast | 16 May 2017

    Chattersquare logoWe come to grips with the dismissal of FBI director James Comey. Is this about optics, process or something else? Then we turn to a more sedate pace in Australia, where the federal budget has neither damaged or boosted the Turnbull government. We finish with a few ways to stay intact in a tumultuous world.

  • ChatterSquare S01E07: Good or bad debt, the first 100 days of Trump, and Pope Francis talks TED

    Podcast | 02 May 2017

    Chattersquare logoIs there such a thing as bad debt when it comes to national budgets? Is infrastructure spending a great idea by default? We also take a glance at the first 100 days of the Trump presidency. As an antidote, we finish with a quick reflection on the latest moves by Pope Francis.

  • ChatterSquare S01E06: John Clarke, the federal budget, United Airlines

    1 Comment
    Podcast | 20 April 2017

    Chattersquare logoOn this episode, we take a moment to remember satirist John Clarke. Then we do an initial read of the story that the Australian federal budget might tell. We also break down that United Airlines incident. There might be detours, so stick close.

  • ChatterSquare S01E05: Moscow connections and the persistence of coal

    Podcast | 06 April 2017

    Chattersquare logoIn this episode, we try to take a knife through Donald Trump's entanglements with Russia. We also discuss coalcare, which is like government insurance for terminal fossil fuel industries. We finish with a quick note on a couple of films that have not been well-received.

  • ChatterSquare Extra: Democracy (for better or worse)

    Podcast | 30 March 2017

    Chattersquare logoWe turn to the Philippines, nearly a year from the elections that made Rodrigo Duterte president. Along with other ructions from 2016, his presidency continues to raise questions about the nature of democracy. To help us make sense of the current moment, we talk to Christopher Tan, a Manila-based lawyer with a public policy background.


WEEK IN POLITICS



Say it like you mean it

Fiona Katauskas

Can you believe these people? We go to all the trouble of making an apology and then they expect us to mean it! Cartoon by Fiona Katauskas


This week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


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