• Feature Article

    People's stories animate the landscapes in which we travel

    Catherine Marshall |  In the past two weeks I've met a man who crossed the Andes on foot, horse, bicycle, car and even rollerblades. I've trekked with a mountain guide to a rocky outcrop upon which he was due to marry his fiancé the following weekend, before abseiling down it with her. I've stood in a forest with a woman who came here in the hope of finding the perfect plot of land. Landscapes have a profound effect on the traveller, but it's their inhabitants who evoke for us the soul of a place far more effectively.
  • Feature Article

    The Amazing Adventures of FreeSpeechMan

    2 Comments
    Fiona Katauskas |  This week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.
  • Feature Article

    Palestinian water divide highlights discrimination

    9 Comments
    Na'ama Carlin |  Some things are invisible until pointed out. Take the water tanks that pepper the rooves of buildings and homes in the West Bank. 'That's how you tell between Palestinian villages and Israeli settlements,' a friend points out. 'The Palestinian homes need water tanks because of restricted water supply from Israel, whereas the settlements don't.' Access to clean water is a fundamental human right, and the water situation in Palestine reveals a cruel privileging of one group over another.
  • Feature Article

    The misuse of migrant labour in our backyard

    4 Comments
    Sayomi Ariyawansa |  In 2015, Four Corners exposed the misuse of migrant labour in Australian horticulture. It found evidence that the labour hire providers routinely underpaid these workers. Once working on-site, some of these workers were required to work excessive hours and endure unsafe conditions. There is great potential for a licensing scheme to bring a degree of regulation. But there are complex reasons behind the prevalence of migrant worker exploitation in the industry, and a licensing scheme is no cure-all.
  • Religious belief in a tempest tossed church

    1 Comment
    Andrew Hamilton | 29 March 2017

    The Tempest-Tossed Church: Being a Catholic today  Gerard WindsorThe Tempest Tossed Church will invite some Catholics to ask how they should visualise and plan for the future of the church. The Catholic challenge will be to shape pockets in which religiously literate and radical communities are formed around the symbols of faith. Its contribution to a more humane society will be made by joining other small groups in keeping alive the sense of 'something more' and by passing on the craft of finding the words, symbols and silences that catch it.

  • People's stories animate the landscapes in which we travel

    Catherine Marshall | 29 March 2017

    Guide stands on the rocky outcrop upon which he was due to marry his fiancé.In the past two weeks I've met a man who crossed the Andes on foot, horse, bicycle, car and even rollerblades. I've trekked with a mountain guide to a rocky outcrop upon which he was due to marry his fiancé the following weekend, before abseiling down it with her. I've stood in a forest with a woman who came here in the hope of finding the perfect plot of land. Landscapes have a profound effect on the traveller, but it's their inhabitants who evoke for us the soul of a place far more effectively.

  • Palestinian water divide highlights discrimination

    9 Comments
    Na'ama Carlin | 28 March 2017

    A home in al-Bireh contrasted with the settlement of Psagot in the background. Note the water tanks.Some things are invisible until pointed out. Take the water tanks that pepper the rooves of buildings and homes in the West Bank. 'That's how you tell between Palestinian villages and Israeli settlements,' a friend points out. 'The Palestinian homes need water tanks because of restricted water supply from Israel, whereas the settlements don't.' Access to clean water is a fundamental human right, and the water situation in Palestine reveals a cruel privileging of one group over another.

  • Keeping race hate at bay in South Africa

    Munyaradzi Makoni | 28 March 2017

    Mamelodi protestersLife is back to normal a month after residents of Mamelodi in South Africa marched from on the Home Affairs offices in protest over criminality among immigrants. Now, there are calls for closer re-examination of the action, which many see as threatening peace in one of Africa's biggest economies. 'If drugs and crime were really the issues, it should have been billed as an anti-drugs, anti-crime march, not an anti-foreigner march,' said Johan Viljoen of Jesuit Refugee Service.

  • Daniel Berrigan's rebel spirit

    1 Comment
    Juan Garrido-Salgado | 27 March 2017

    Daniel BerriganPain is a cold food like garbage left, no compassion ... Compassion, bread and old wine, waste in a temple to worship money and power. Mankind has lost its root system thirst for happiness. Our bread is autumn leaf tossed into the branches as the bird dies. They make wine from the waters of these rivers suffering bloodied by the blood of Syrian children. Wine is the blood of indifference on the streets of Palestine. The wine is the blood of cruelty in Nauru ... why are you silent?

  • People power the solar revolution

    8 Comments
    Francine Crimmins | 27 March 2017

    Tesla PowerwallEarlier this month Tesla launched the Powerwall 2. In the transition to renewable energy, it may be the biggest disruption to hit traditional energy companies yet. In fact, it's probably their worst nightmare. Our role in energy under this innovation has changed from us being consumers to possibly all being providers. Just as Uber disrupted taxis and Airbnb disrupted traditional hotel chains, so too will the Tesla battery change our relationships and transactions with energy.

  • The misuse of migrant labour in our backyard

    4 Comments
    Sayomi Ariyawansa | 24 March 2017

    Migrant workers attached to supermarket balls and chains. Cartoon by Chris JohnstonIn 2015, Four Corners exposed the misuse of migrant labour in Australian horticulture. It found evidence that the labour hire providers routinely underpaid these workers. Once working on-site, some of these workers were required to work excessive hours and endure unsafe conditions. There is great potential for a licensing scheme to bring a degree of regulation. But there are complex reasons behind the prevalence of migrant worker exploitation in the industry, and a licensing scheme is no cure-all.

  • Rethinking and reconstructing youth justice

    10 Comments
    Terry Laidler | 24 March 2017

    Silhouette of boy and barsMany of the kids in the juvenile justice system have been abused, come from dysfunctional families or state care, or have untreated behavioural or mental health problems. Warehousing them in punishing idleness and expecting passive compliance, let alone any recovery, is fanciful. I have begun to think about how we could respond to these kids in a holistic way, with a strong emphasis on prevention and diversion. These proposals relate to current the system in Victoria, but generalise easily.

  • Indigenous citizenship rights 50 years after the referendum

    7 Comments
    Dani Larkin | 23 March 2017

    Front page of Abo Call newspaperIn the face of historically low levels of Indigenous representation in our parliaments, the Indigenous caucus between Commonwealth, State and Territory Labor representatives points to some progress. It is aimed at increasing Indigenous voter engagement figures, increasing Indigenous Labor candidacy, and developing strategic plans that encourage Indigenous students to become young leaders in Parliament. Those are all necessary and noteworthy causes. But we have a long way to go.


Featured Writers

  • Catherine Marshall

    Catherine Marshall headshot

    "Even the emptiest of continents cannot be adequately understood without human interpretation."
     read more

     

  • Fatima Measham

    Fatima Measham headshot

    "Perhaps it is enough to remember that the rule of law is often invoked by those who benefit from the status quo."
     read more

     

  • Francine Crimmins

    Francine Crimmins

    "Install solar systems alongside one of these batteries and never worry about another Energy Australia bill."
     read more

     

  • Frank Brennan

    Frank Brennan headshot

    "Simply leaving 18C unamended is not a sensible option. It's broke, so fix it!"
     read more

     

  • ChatterSquare S01E04: Weatherill, the Snowy and neutrality

    Podcast | 21 March 2017

    Chattersquare logoIn this episode, we touch on energy, infrastructure and the political lens through which we receive nation-building ideas. We talk about Jay Weatherill, the South Australian Premier, who gave a master class this week in how to make federal ministers squirm. We also ask whether it is possible for journalists to remain neutral, a quarter into the Trump presidency.

  • ChatterSquare Extra: Is Justin Trudeau really all that?

    Podcast | 14 March 2017

    Chattersquare logoJustin Trudeau became Prime Minister of Canada in 2015, taking the Liberal Party to a strong majority after nearly a decade of Conservative rule. He signaled many things that were seen as progressive. But is he really all that? In this episode of ChatterSquare Extra, we catch up with Neal Jennings, Canadian politics nerd, who joins us from Vancouver.

  • ChatterSquare S01E03: Turnbull, catharsis and scapegoating

    Podcast | 07 March 2017

    Chattersquare logoIn this episode, we feel a bit sorry for Malcolm Turnbull and wonder whether the electorate even cares who is leader anymore. We also discuss scapegoating and how attempts to discriminate lead to indiscriminate effects.

  • ChatterSquare Extra: Reading history in the age of Trump

    Podcast | 28 February 2017

    Chattersquare logoIn this episode, we chat with Dr Evan Smith, from the School of History and International Relations at Flinders University, Adelaide. We go over some of the historical analogies being made about the Trump administration, why people are drawn to them, and the pitfalls of reaching into the past to make sense of the present.

  • ChatterSquare S01E02: Hansonism, fear and fantasy

    Podcast | 21 February 2017

    Chattersquare logoIs there an upside to Hansonism? In this episode, we try to figure out what One Nation actually has to offer. We also talk about fear and how some Americans are dealing with the Trump era by turning to fantasy literature. Is this just escapism?


WEEK IN POLITICS



The Amazing Adventures of FreeSpeechMan

Fiona Katauskas

Malcolm Turnbull as Freespeechman protects racist from the accusations of someone he has offended. Cartoon by Fiona Katauskas


This week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


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