• Feature Article

    The wedding party

    1 Comment
    Fiona Katauskas |  This week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.
  • Feature Article

    Health gap widens as wage growth falls

    Amy Coopes |  Universal health care is an ostensibly bipartisan prerogative, but what it actually means and how it's achieved is a somewhat moveable feast. Spending, we are told, is unsustainable as the population ages and we move toward ever-more personalised and technologically-advanced treatment paradigms. The objective of this rhetoric is to rationalise the privatisation of our health system by stealth. The latest wages figures are something of an inconvenient truth in this 'unsustainable spending' fiction.
  • Feature Article

    Reimagining work is a project for the unemployed, too

    1 Comment
    Susan Leong |  When I wrote recently that the future of work lies in understanding work as 'pleasure in the exercise of our energies', one reader noted 'these discussions have little meaning when you are poor or dispossessed'. Spending your life doing what you are competent at pales into insignificance when set against the prospect of a life engrossed in one's passions. That is a decision that every worker has it within their power to make. And as it turns out, it should be a concern of the unemployed, too.
  • Feature Article

    No minister is an island

    7 Comments
    Kate Galloway |  Three Commonwealth ministers faced the Victorian Court of Appeal on 16 June to make submissions as to why they shouldn't be charged with contempt of court. This extraordinary occurrence arose because the ministers made public comments about a sentencing matter still under deliberation. Andrew Hamilton has in these pages looked at how the ministers' comments might offend the presumption of innocence. However, there is a further issue at stake - a question of good government.
  • RIP David Passi, last surviving Mabo plaintiff

    Frank Brennan | 26 June 2017

    David Passi on Thursday IslandAnglican priest, traditional landowner and land rights campaigner David Passi has died. He was the last surviving plaintiff in the historic Mabo decision. A year after the Mabo decision I travelled to the Torres Strait and met James Rice and Passi, the two successful litigants in the case. Returning by boat to the mainland from the island of Mer in the Murray Islands, the waters of the Torres Strait were exceedingly calm.

  • Health gap widens as wage growth falls

    Amy Coopes | 26 June 2017

    Cardiovascular diseaseUniversal health care is an ostensibly bipartisan prerogative, but what it actually means and how it's achieved is a somewhat moveable feast. Spending, we are told, is unsustainable as the population ages and we move toward ever-more personalised and technologically-advanced treatment paradigms. The objective of this rhetoric is to rationalise the privatisation of our health system by stealth. The latest wages figures are something of an inconvenient truth in this 'unsustainable spending' fiction.

  • My hospital visit

    2 Comments
    Isabella Fels | 26 June 2017

    Woman in hospital roomLying here in this hole, I try to feel whole, trying to do as I am told, making a few bold moves, as I swing out of bed, and hang onto my mobility devices - which I am getting the hang of, almost like learning how to drive a car - and showing lots of drive. In bed, not even well read, just eating bread, staring right ahead. As you help me pack up my things I no longer feel stuck in the same place, falling steadily in many different ways, no longer feeling the sun's rays ...

  • Reimagining work is a project for the unemployed, too

    1 Comment
    Susan Leong | 23 June 2017

    Cartoon by Chris JohnstonWhen I wrote recently that the future of work lies in understanding work as 'pleasure in the exercise of our energies', one reader noted 'these discussions have little meaning when you are poor or dispossessed'. Spending your life doing what you are competent at pales into insignificance when set against the prospect of a life engrossed in one's passions. That is a decision that every worker has it within their power to make. And as it turns out, it should be a concern of the unemployed, too.

  • No minister is an island

    7 Comments
    Kate Galloway | 23 June 2017

    Michael SukkarThree Commonwealth ministers faced the Victorian Court of Appeal on 16 June to make submissions as to why they shouldn't be charged with contempt of court. This extraordinary occurrence arose because the ministers made public comments about a sentencing matter still under deliberation. Andrew Hamilton has in these pages looked at how the ministers' comments might offend the presumption of innocence. However, there is a further issue at stake - a question of good government.

  • Justice is weakened when the court of public opinion reigns

    1 Comment
    Andrew Hamilton | 22 June 2017

    Judge's gavel on laptop keyboardThe presumption of innocence has recently been in the dock, notably in the curious affair of the three federal Ministers and the Victorian Court of Appeal. Other cases have raised the question whether in our society the presumption that those accused of crimes are innocent until found guilty is yielding. Is it now the case that people who have been found guilty in the court of public opinion have to prove their innocence, and that courts will be judged to have failed unless they ratify the guilty verdict?

  • Finkel and the climate theatre of the absurd

    5 Comments
    Greg Foyster | 22 June 2017

    xxxxxIf politics is theatre, climate politics is a family drama. For the last decade we've watched two rival households having the same endless argument. Political journos call it the 'climate wars' and mostly focus on the lead actors standing in the spotlight - in the Western narrative tradition, characters drive events. Almost no one has noticed the scenery change. Stagehands dismantled the backdrop years ago, but politicians have carried on as if the same circumstances existed when they started this charade.

  • Hanson's autism comments miss the value of diversity

    19 Comments
    Madeleine Hamilton | 22 June 2017

    Pauline HansonThe mood was subdued at the gates of our small Catholic primary school at 3:30pm on Wednesday. Ten per cent of our school's students have an autism diagnosis, and for their parents who had read Pauline Hanson's comments to the Senate that afternoon, those familiar feelings - dismay at the ignorance and lack of empathy of some people, worry for the future, and defiant pride in their diverse children - had been activated yet again.

  • The Lady Macbeth of Northumberland

    2 Comments
    Tim Kroenert | 21 June 2017

    Catherine arrives a new bride, with husband Alexander, to take up residence in his luxurious rural home. Quickly we get a sense of how little control she has over her destiny. Alexander demands she remain inside the house at all times; when one evening she wishes to go to bed early, her father-in-law orders her to remain awake for her husband. In the life of the household, she is merely an attractive object. Yet like her Shakespearean forebear, she is not averse to manipulation and violence in pursuit of her goals.


Featured Writers

  • Catherine Marshall

    Catherine Marshall headshot

    "For the traveller, these ever tighter-restrictions have already turned a commonplace activity into one riddled with fear and mistrust."
     read more

     

  • Fatima Measham

    Fatima Measham headshot

    "This is typical of the mediocrity that keeps Australia inert."
     read more

     

  • Greg Foyster

    Greg Foyster headshot

    "It's another example of how clean, green and efficient technologies still aren't accessible to everyone. This is a massive injustice in the making."
     read more

     

  • Kate Galloway

    Kate Galloway

    "Failing to adhere to these basic norms of good governance puts our system at risk."
     read more

     

  • ChatterSquare Extra: How science intersects with politics, religion and the humanities

    Podcast | 27 June 2017

    Chattersquare logoIs science political? Does it actually have something in common with religion? And how do the humanities enhance scientific endeavour? We tackle these questions with @realscientists co-founder, science communicator and nanotech researcher Upulie Divisekera.

  • S01E10: Foreign state interference, UK elections and Wonder Woman

    Podcast | 13 June 2017

    Chattersquare logoFormer FBI Director James Comey's latest testimony, foreign donations to Australian political parties, and freelance hackers reportedly triggering a diplomatic crisis in the Arabian Peninsula: what does it all mean? We also touch on the implications of a hung parliament in the UK, including lessons from recent Australian experience. We finish with Wonder Woman and the elements that made it work.

  • ChatterSquare Extra: Is religion reporting no longer relevant?

    Podcast | 08 June 2017

    Chattersquare logoShouldn't religion be treated like an essential news desk? What does journalistic competence in this area look like? How do funding cuts affect the way religion is covered? In this Extra episode of ChatterSquare, Rohan Salmond and Tito Ambyo take us through the challenges and benefits of religion reporting.

  • ChatterSquare S01E09: Trump at the Vatican, unsafe journalists, and a Statement from the Heart

    2 Comments
    Podcast | 31 May 2017

    Chattersquare logoShould Pope Francis be meeting the likes of Donald Trump? Do politicians owe journalists anything? And what makes the Uluru Statement a potential game-changer? Join Jim and Fatima as they dive into these and other questions.

  • ChatterSquare S01E08: Comey dismissal and the Australian federal budget

    Podcast | 16 May 2017

    Chattersquare logoWe come to grips with the dismissal of FBI director James Comey. Is this about optics, process or something else? Then we turn to a more sedate pace in Australia, where the federal budget has neither damaged or boosted the Turnbull government. We finish with a few ways to stay intact in a tumultuous world.


WEEK IN POLITICS



The wedding party

Fiona Katauskas

Liberal Party is divided during a same sex wedding. Cartoon by Fiona Katauskas


This week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


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