• Feature Article

    SA Premier coopts democracy for nuclear nefariousness

    Michele Madigan |  Just how strictly controlled the process is becomes obvious when it emerges that the task of the 50 member Citizens' Jury will be to produce 'a short independent guide to help every South Australian understand the recommendations raised' by the report. ABC news has dubbed this whole process the Premier's 'public relations exercise', and surely they're not wrong. He is urging all South Australians to remain 'open' about the proposal. But are they, including the Citizens' Jury, allowed to be open to refusal?
  • Feature Article

    Not-so-nice guys have sexist cake and eat it too

    Tim Kroenert |  As is the time-honoured tradition of Hollywood PIs, Holland has long bound the wounds of some unresolved grief in alcohol and cynicism. Notwithstanding individual tastes that are by no means aligned with gender, this is the kind of movie that can tend to appeal to puerile male interests while diminishing respect for women. In this regard Shane Black, a mainstream filmmaker who is more self-aware than most, tries to have his cake and eat it too, by both drawing and subverting the objectifying male gaze.
  • Feature Article

    Banking royal commission is popular, not populist

    4 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton |  The evidence of misbehaviour by banks has become public at a time when the underlying ideology has also been criticised. The inherent unlikelihood that an economy based on individual greed will benefit the whole of society is now patent. It is seen as much more likely that unregulated competition for material gain will lead to the concentration of wealth in the hands of the wealthy and powerful. Evidence now suggests that inequality hinders the economic growth it was presumed to nurture.
  • Feature Article

    Good leaders need the confidence to listen

    8 Comments
    Esther Anatolitis |  Universities and the CSIRO are attacked and funds cut while the government promotes an 'ideas boom'. Creative industries and the Australia Council are diminished and investment slashed while the government talks of an 'innovation agenda'. It takes confidence in your own skill as a decision-maker to recognise the expertise of others as something you don't share but can benefit from. Instead we see nervous leadership, too anxious to trust in those who can build that future.
  • Feature Article

    Conversations with homeless protesters

    6 Comments
    Tim Robertson |  I asked John, a tall, articulate man with long hair and well-maintained hipster beard, if he'd had a chance to read the most recently published Herald Sun think-piece arguing that what they are doing is not a demand for help, but a political protest.He smiled wryly, expelled a couple of bursts of laughter and said that that may be their most accurate reporting of the unfolding situation to-date: 'This has always been a political protest ... that's always been our intention.'
  • Feature Article

    Engaging with Dutton's rhetoric is a slippery slope

    32 Comments
    Somayra Ismailjee |  The irony of trying to negate these stereotypes is that in doing so, we are still cheapening asylum seekers to political tools, stripping them of their humanity and multiplicity. Aiming to counter such rhetoric as Dutton's with stories of high-achieving refugees plays into a toxic game that legitimises the same negative stereotypes by engaging with them. Just as invisibility dehumanises asylum seekers, so does the hypervisibility we attribute to a select few stories.
  • SA Premier coopts democracy for nuclear nefariousness

    Michele Madigan | 26 May 2016

    Maralinga Painting, by artists Mima Smart, Tjunkuna Rita Bryant and othersJust how strictly controlled the process is becomes obvious when it emerges that the task of the 50 member Citizens' Jury will be to produce 'a short independent guide to help every South Australian understand the recommendations raised' by the report. ABC news has dubbed this whole process the Premier's 'public relations exercise', and surely they're not wrong. He is urging all South Australians to remain 'open' about the proposal. But are they, including the Citizens' Jury, allowed to be open to refusal?

  • Not-so-nice guys have sexist cake and eat it too

    Tim Kroenert | 26 May 2016

    As is the time-honoured tradition of Hollywood PIs, Holland has long bound the wounds of some unresolved grief in alcohol and cynicism. Notwithstanding individual tastes that are by no means aligned with gender, this is the kind of movie that can tend to appeal to puerile male interests while diminishing respect for women. In this regard Shane Black, a mainstream filmmaker who is more self-aware than most, tries to have his cake and eat it too, by both drawing and subverting the objectifying male gaze.

  • Banking royal commission is popular, not populist

    4 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 25 May 2016

    Australian banks logosThe evidence of misbehaviour by banks has become public at a time when the underlying ideology has also been criticised. The inherent unlikelihood that an economy based on individual greed will benefit the whole of society is now patent. It is seen as much more likely that unregulated competition for material gain will lead to the concentration of wealth in the hands of the wealthy and powerful. Evidence now suggests that inequality hinders the economic growth it was presumed to nurture.

  • Rumours of thylacines and distant barbarians

    Shane McCauley | 24 May 2016

    Perth skylineHere in this weather-beleaguered outpost there are so many rumours - thylacines, panthers, wagyls even that in the distant east are barbarians ... But separating deserts might as well be galaxies, and we are self-contained, and even like those theoretical others have our contentments - blue sky, blue sea, and even now the sun's great wintery eye. Hidden as we are however we hold our heads high, perhaps would not be ashamed one day to be discovered ...

  • Good leaders need the confidence to listen

    8 Comments
    Esther Anatolitis | 24 May 2016

    Expert offering adviceUniversities and the CSIRO are attacked and funds cut while the government promotes an 'ideas boom'. Creative industries and the Australia Council are diminished and investment slashed while the government talks of an 'innovation agenda'. It takes confidence in your own skill as a decision-maker to recognise the expertise of others as something you don't share but can benefit from. Instead we see nervous leadership, too anxious to trust in those who can build that future.

  • Conversations with homeless protesters

    6 Comments
    Tim Robertson | 23 May 2016

    Site of the homeless protest campI asked John, a tall, articulate man with long hair and well-maintained hipster beard, if he'd had a chance to read the most recently published Herald Sun think-piece arguing that what they are doing is not a demand for help, but a political protest. He smiled wryly, expelled a couple of bursts of laughter and said that that may be their most accurate reporting of the unfolding situation to-date: 'This has always been a political protest ... that's always been our intention.'

  • Engaging with Dutton's rhetoric is a slippery slope

    32 Comments
    Somayra Ismailjee | 20 May 2016

    Image from the I Came By Boat campaignThe irony of trying to negate these stereotypes is that in doing so, we are still cheapening asylum seekers to political tools, stripping them of their humanity and multiplicity. Aiming to counter such rhetoric as Dutton's with stories of high-achieving refugees plays into a toxic game that legitimises the same negative stereotypes by engaging with them. Just as invisibility dehumanises asylum seekers, so does the hypervisibility we attribute to a select few stories.

  • Catholic bishops deliver election year ethical wedge

    11 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 19 May 2016

    Family sceneThe bishops speak less trenchantly than Pope Francis, who criticises sharply the assumptions and practices of neoliberal economics. But in the context of this election, they add their voice to that of those who are concerned about economic assumptions that enrich the few and exempt corporations and business from social responsibility. Their statement will encourage those who see the now notorious behaviour of banks, finance business and corporations as symptomatic of a vicious economic ideology.

  • Inside Nauru nightmare

    3 Comments
    Tim Kroenert | 19 May 2016

    With PNG's Supreme Court finding last month that the detention of asylum seekers on Manus Island was unconstitutional, the shamefulness of Australia's border protection policies was once again laid bare. Advocates will be familiar with the facts and arguments that Chasing Asylum articulates. What sets it apart is its wealth of hidden camera footage caught within the grim confines of the centre on Nauru, and Orner's conversations with detainees and social workers who bore witness to the dire daily reality there.

  • Recognition or treaty ... Why not both?

    10 Comments
    Kate Galloway | 18 May 2016

    Aboriginal woman with Recognise balloonsNewly appointed Senator for Western Australia, Pat Dodson, in his first week on the job, raised the thorny political question of treaty. I see the need for both treaty and constitutional reform, which support each other in promoting justice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. But the limitations of my understanding are both that I am a lawyer, and that I am not an Indigenous Australian. I need to heed the diverse voices of Indigenous Australia in understanding what is truly at stake.

  • Chilling and killing Duncan Storrar's free speech

    9 Comments
    Justin Glyn | 18 May 2016

    Duncan StorrarTo put it bluntly, this is the point at which the free speech argument, like the Ouroboros serpent of ancient myth, eats its own tail. While the newspapers claimed that they were exercising their rights to free speech in their daily articles against Storrar, the effect of their dragging his name and life through the mud was undoubtedly that any other member of the public who dared ask awkward questions of their rulers would think again.


Featured Writers

  • Andrew Hamilton

    Andrew Hamilton headshot

    "The lack of respect for these things has its source in a culture that subordinates the welfare of people to economic growth and the making of wealth."
     read more

     

  • Ellena Savage

    Ellena Savage headshot

    "Cycling between these two states of 'freedom' - excess and control - is a natural expression of the time we are living in."
     read more

     

  • Fatima Measham

    Fatima Measham headshot

    "I have to hope that hard-won Philippine democratic institutions will not only bear a Duterte presidency but refine it."
     read more

     

  • Frank Brennan

    Frank Brennan headshot

    "Dodson will be an adornment to the Senate, and may help address some of the underlying causes he identified as a royal commissioner a quarter century ago."
     read more

     

  • Gillian Bouras

    Gillian Bouras

    "There is, of course, nothing wrong with money in itself. The real problem is that many, many people have not got enough of the stuff."
     read more

     

  • Justin Glyn

    Justin Glyn

    "It is hard to believe that this chilling of Storrar's free speech (and those who would emulate him) was accidental."
     read more

     

  • Kate Galloway

    Kate Galloway

    "It started with a conversation with a young Aboriginal man, a former student of mine, who was demanding treaty and who saw recognition as a trap."
     read more

     

  • Miracle of the Andalusia schoolhouse wasp

    12 Comments
    Dan Graham | 20 May 2016

    School buildingI attempted to continue with the class but it was impossible for the children to ignore the wasp. I elected to evacuate. We had our lesson on the playground. One of the kids went home and told their mother about the wasp and that instead of class, we'd had an extra long lunch. The mother failed to appreciate the dilemma I'd faced, called my boss and asked her how I could be trusted with 20 children when I couldn't even handle a single wasp. Next week, same class, the wasp returned.

  • A righteous sermon about the haves and have-nots

    9 Comments
    Gillian Bouras | 23 May 2016

    Man in suit holding cashIn America, Rex Tillerson, CEO of Exxon, received a salary of more than $40 million in 2012. He is apparently a devout Christian, so I wonder whether he ever worries about Matthew chapter 19, verse 24: it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than it is for a rich man to enter into the Kingdom of God. The 400 richest Americans own more wealth than the GDP of India. In contrast, vast numbers of their fellow citizens have less than $1000 in their savings and cheque accounts combined.

  • Setting subeditors' slights to rights

    4 Comments
    Brian Matthews | 25 May 2016

    Newspaper with Correction headlineUnder election campaign pressure, some names have been misprinted. Mr Malcolm Ternble of Naracoorte wishes to point out that he has not made any public statements on negative gearing and is unsure what negative gearing means. The error was made by a Gen Y subeditor and should have read 'Prime Minister Malcolm Ternbull'. The Foreign Minister was cited as Ms Julia Bishop. The correct nomenclature is Ms Julia Bronwyn. Ms Bronwyn was inaccurately described as a part-time helicopter pilot.

  • Inequality in Australia is dental as anything

    5 Comments
    Barry Gittins | 13 May 2016

    x-ray of teethBritish research presented at the 2013 International Association of Dental Research posited 'a link between missing teeth and a patient's quality of life' and cited other research on observers' 'perception of men and women with straight and crooked teeth'. Furthermore, research by the Salvation Army in Australia records that 66 per cent of the Salvos' welfare clients could not afford dental treatment and two in five could not afford a yearly dental check-up for their children.

  • 21st century binge and purge

    2 Comments
    Ellena Savage | 16 May 2016

    Beer bottle and cigarette buttsWhen my alarm goes off in the morning I reach for my phone: check mail, check ABC, check Twitter. Get up, make filter coffee, pour one. Open my diary and spreadsheet, start working. Pour my second coffee. Eat something, clock calories in. Go for a walk, pick up whatever groceries, clock calories out. Back to work. If whatever I am working on isn't very interesting, this accounting for a day, after day, after day, is fairly sad. But it's also just living a life in 2016.


WEEK IN POLITICS



Reading, writing and rhetoric

Fiona Katauskas

Young girl walks away from Peter Dutton dressed as a teacher, telling her mother he told her 'refugee' spelt 'trouble'. Cartoon by Fiona Katauskas


This week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


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