• Feature Article

    Australia's days of the dead

    Michael McVeigh |  ANZAC Day is a powerful and worthy ritual. But the tales of our soldiers make up only one of the ongoing chapters in the story of our country. There are many others. On 25 January, let us remember the Indigenous people who once nurtured the land. On 25 February, let us remember those who gave their lives in settling this unforgiving land. On 25 March, let us remember the people who lost their lives migrating to this country.
  • Feature Article

    South Sudan warning for Australia's hate speech champions

    1 Comment
    Michael Mullins |  In South Sudan, hate speech broadcast on a local FM radio station earlier this month led to the slaughter of hundreds of innocent civilians in a massacre based on ethnicity. Local UN officials are now calling on authorities to 'to take all measures possible to prevent the airing of such messages'. Meanwhile in Australia, the Government is attempting to give legal sanction to the kind of hate speech that incited to the South Sudan massacre.
  • Feature Article

    My pop's Anzac nightmares

    Tim Kroenert |  As a stretcher bearer, he tended to two landmine victims, including one who had lost his leg. He spent the night darting between the two men, providing physical aid, and whatever comfort and assurance was possible. Turns out he was lucky that he didn't end up laid out alongside them: the next morning he discovered that the entire narrow ridge was riddled with mines. 'That was fairly close,' he admitted. It was an understatement.
  • Feature Article

    Anzac myths beyond the Alan Bond test

    13 Comments
    Ray Cassin |  In 1983, when his yacht Australia II won the America's Cup, Alan Bond hailed the feat as the greatest Australian victory since Gallipoli. His ludicrous misspeaking shows that by the 1980s the mythmakers' interpretation of the significance of Gallipoli was dominant. But the notion that the Diggers of Gallipoli and their successors in subsequent wars are somehow the paramount exemplars of Australian virtues does not survive scrutiny.

Australia's days of the dead

Michael McVeigh | 28 April 2014

Gravestones in dead grassANZAC Day is a powerful and worthy ritual. But the tales of our soldiers make up only one of the ongoing chapters in the story of our country. There are many others. On 25 January, let us remember the Indigenous people who once nurtured the land. On 25 February, let us remember those who gave their lives in settling this unforgiving land. On 25 March, let us remember the people who lost their lives migrating to this country.

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  • Anzac myths beyond the Alan Bond test

    13 Comments
    Ray Cassin | 24 April 2014

    Soldiers silhouetteIn 1983, when his yacht Australia II won the America's Cup, Alan Bond hailed the feat as the greatest Australian victory since Gallipoli. His ludicrous misspeaking shows that by the 1980s the mythmakers' interpretation of the significance of Gallipoli was dominant. But the notion that the Diggers of Gallipoli and their successors in subsequent wars are somehow the paramount exemplars of Australian virtues does not survive scrutiny.

  • A plague of killer robots

    6 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 23 April 2014

    Arnold Schwarzenegger as The TerminatorKiller robots — drones in an advanced stage of development — are now a daytime reality. They will be autonomous in their operation, able to identify targets, track them down, work out the best way to destroy them, and learn from their failures, all without the need for human direction. These qualities raise serious ethical questions. Obama's use of just war theory to defend such drones was misguided at best, pernicious at worst.

  • Sympathy for Barry O'Farrell

    12 Comments
    Moira Rayner | 22 April 2014

    Barry O'FarrellOccupants of public office are expected to act in accordance with their oaths. An anti-corruption commissioner, for example, should be someone whose own conduct is not just seen to be, but is demonstrably, judicious, ethical and proper. Even a minor failure in that was the reason that, several years ago, I resigned as an acting corruption and crime commissioner in another state. In my case, it didn't end there. But in O'Farrell's it should.

  • Easter memory loss makes plastic of the present

    16 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 17 April 2014

    Moses parts the red seaBoth the Jewish Passover and the Christian Easter are exercises in memory. The Jewish child who asks why this day is remembered is told a story of slavery in Egypt followed by deliverance by God. He stands in line with other children who asked the same question during the Holocaust. The devaluation of history and memory has a deeply corrosive effect on society. In our society we can see this in our treatment of asylum seekers.

  • Push for boycott ban reveals economic double standard

    6 Comments
    Fatima Measham | 16 April 2014

    Young man hold's a placard that declares 'Don't buy'A review of competition laws is allowing the Government and industry groups to push for a ban on environmental boycotts. It is a strange protectionism that portrays industries as victims, defenceless against the barrage of readily available information. It appears the free flow of information cannot be so free as to disrupt capital, and the only legitimate choices within a free market are ones unimpeded by ethics or conscience.

  • Asylum seeker protest models 'habits of the heart'

    22 Comments
    Michael McVeigh | 15 April 2014

    Protestors marchOn Sunday, tens of thousands of people took to the streets to protest the Government's treatment of asylum seekers. This wasn't a group of radicals — it was Grandma and Grandpa, Mum and Dad and the kids, making a statement to a callous political elite. Rather than simply asking how we can become more decent towards asylum seekers, it's time to ask: What reserves do we, as a country, have to resist inhumane forces that besiege us?

  • On the way to Golgotha

    1 Comment
    Various | 15 April 2014

    Desolate landscape with three crossesA path of varicose roots rising from sodden ground showed the way to a rock placed upon a rock; a face with random nails stuck like a half-crown of thorns in the roughly groomed clay; the eyes stared out from bulbous sacs, the mouth downturned like any mouth on any face ... I was frightened that he might choose me as a resting place.

  • The people power of Game of Thrones pirates

    3 Comments
    Michael Mullins | 14 April 2014

    Game of Thrones stillLast week's Game of Thrones series four premiere revealed Melbourne as the pirate capital of the world. The downloaders make a 'people power' claim to moral legitimacy because they think pay TV provider Foxtel's business model undermines the access they believe they are entitled to. Stories are not a cultural form of terra nullius, and human nature will not allow them to be wholly appropriated by business interests.

  • 'Normal' royals are not like us

    22 Comments
    Ruby Hamad | 14 April 2014

    'Baby prince' by Chris Johnston shows Prince George sitting on a throneBy clinging to this notion that the royals are just like us, even as we treat them as anything but, we brush aside the inconvenient fact that their status is a relic of a bygone era in which royal rule was enforced through brutal means. Is it right to forget that the British monarchy presided over colonialist expansion with all its associated genocides? A class system that bestows inherited superiority is a remnant of a more oppressive era best left in the past.

  • Punk's holy fools still putting it to Putin

    Barry Gittins and Jen Vuk | 11 April 2014

    Cover of Masha Gessen's Words Will Break Cement features members of Pussy Riot in balaclavas dancing Journalist Masha Gessen describes the members of Pussy Riot as 'Putin's ideal enemies'. In recent months, their nemesis has hosted the Olympics, taken control of Crimea and clamped down on media. For a group born out of 'the repressions of a corporate political system that directs its power against basic human rights', Pussy Riot still has much to roar about, even if its signature 'punk prayer' sounds more than ever like a plea.

  • Palmer power! Lessons from the Senate by-election

    2 Comments
    Ray Cassin | 11 April 2014

    Clive PalmerThe most insidious outcome of the WA Senate election is the bargaining power it has delivered to Clive Palmer, the Queensland mining magnate who dominates the party on which he has bestowed his name. He massively outspent all his rivals, raising yet again the question of whether limits should be placed on private financing of political campaigns. It is a question that, because of his newfound clout, will not be answered anytime soon.


  • My brother the silent veteran

    5 Comments
    Julie Kean | 23 April 2014

    Australian soldier silhouetteI was 13 when he went to Vietnam. There was a kind of perverse status to be derived from having a brother called up for national service, and for him to head north of the equator was a further plus. When I participated in a Moratorium March it remained my secret. What did he see over there? What did he manage to forget over his subsequent 34 years? We'll never know because he never said. And he never participated in Anzac Day.

  • Workplace safety issues in South Korean ferry disaster

    1 Comment
    Andrew Hamilton | 29 April 2014

    The capsized ferryIt would be unfeeling and presumptuous to speculate on the causes of the disaster. But it may be helpful to enumerate the questions that have been asked, as they disclose a pattern. In travel by ship, as in many other enterprises, there are two sets of interests: the operational interests of those who provide the service, and the interests of those who benefit from the service. Companies ideally take both seriously, but they stand in tension.

  • South Sudan warning for Australia's hate speech champions

    1 Comment
    Michael Mullins | 28 April 2014

    Cartoon of man spouting angry speechIn South Sudan, hate speech broadcast on a local FM radio station earlier this month led to the slaughter of hundreds of innocent civilians in a massacre based on ethnicity. Local UN officials are now calling on authorities to 'to take all measures possible to prevent the airing of such messages'. Meanwhile in Australia, the Government is attempting to give legal sanction to the kind of hate speech that incited to the South Sudan massacre.

  • My pop's Anzac nightmares

    Tim Kroenert | 24 April 2014

    Silhouette of a soldier playing a bugleAs a stretcher bearer, he tended to two landmine victims, including one who had lost his leg. He spent the night darting between the two men, providing physical aid, and whatever comfort and assurance was possible. Turns out he was lucky that he didn't end up laid out alongside them: the next morning he discovered that the entire narrow ridge was riddled with mines. 'That was fairly close,' he admitted. It was an understatement.

  • The peacemaker pope

    1 Comment
    Bruce Duncan | 24 April 2014

    Pacem in Terris book coverQuite striking is the similarity between the warm response to Pope John XXIII half a century ago and to Pope Francis today. Both broke through the gilded cage of outdated conventions and stereotyped expectations. Both stepped over barriers of ideology or religion to evoke bonds of a common humanity committed to promoting the wellbeing of all people, especially the poor and marginalised. The contexts were of course quite different.


WEEK IN POLITICS



Abbott's royal gush

Fiona Katauskas

Fiona Katauskas' cartoon 'Abbott's royal gush' shows Tony Abbott in a suit of armour kneeling and praising the infant Prince George, who is being fed by his father Prince William

View this week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


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