• Feature Article

    Dual citizenship should be a plus in modern Australia

    10 Comments
    Fatima Measham |  There are layers of frustration around the resignation of Greens senators Scott Ludlam and Larissa Waters due to dual citizenship. The immediate loss of two of Australia's better parliamentary performers - on any side of politics - is unfortunate. For no one in their orbit and nothing in the AEC nomination process to have caught something so fundamental is unsettling, but perhaps not that odd. Presumptions of Australian-ness are more or less adjudicated on a certain kind of look and surname.
  • Feature Article

    Electricity market for dummies (i.e. politicians)

    4 Comments
    Greg Foyster |  After months of very silly debate about clean energy, one thing is abundantly clear: the electricity market is evolving much faster than most politicians and commentators can understand it. The story underneath all the distraction is that wind and solar have already changed the game. As that big Finkel report no one read made clear, 'there is no going back from the massive industrial, technological and economic changes facing our electricity system'.
  • Feature Article

    Senator Ludlam's crime and punishment

    9 Comments
    John Warhurst |  Ludlam's departure means that the Senate has now had three senators, including Bob Day, the Family First leader, from South Australia, and Rod Culleton of the One Nation Party, who was also from Western Australia, declared ineligible to sit in the Parliament in the 12 months since the last election. One is an accident but three is an epidemic. This is a disturbing turn of events.
  • Feature Article

    Sexual harassment in Australia and the US

    9 Comments
    Sara Vukojevic |  I couldn't believe it. It was the most obvious example of street harassment ever. Builders? Check. Cheesy pickup lines? Check. Innuendos? Check. Trying to prevent a woman from moving away? Check. It could've been a lot worse. Something worse happened to me in California. But this situation got my heart beating. It's six, large, capable men. They can do anything they want to me. I can't prevent it from happening if they decide they need to do more than look.
  • Feature Article

    Encryption and liberties on the 'ungovernable' internet

    5 Comments
    Binoy Kampmark |  Turnbull's attitude echoes the fear all autocracies have: that control is slipping away, and that citizens cannot be trusted to behave in a modern communications environment without government intrusions. Arguments are repeatedly made that such enlarged powers are never abused - a charmingly naive assumption - and that law enforcement authorities merely need the 'capacity' to have them. These can either abate, or be extended, after a review. The reality tends to be different.
  • Feature Article

    Bookending Australia's history

    9 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton |  Modern Australian history is bookended by the arrival of white settlers in which Indigenous Australians were expelled to the margins, and by the arrival of people seeking protection who were also expelled to the margins. Between these bookends lie the events, the people, the relationships, the enterprises and the experiences that compose the story of Australia. The bookends, though, are a bit shonky: not ideal for supporting proudly the heft of the history that lies between them. They need fixing.
  • Dual citizenship should be a plus in modern Australia

    10 Comments
    Fatima Measham | 21 July 2017

    Greens Senator Larissa WatersThere are layers of frustration around the resignation of Greens senators Scott Ludlam and Larissa Waters due to dual citizenship. The immediate loss of two of Australia's better parliamentary performers - on any side of politics - is unfortunate. For no one in their orbit and nothing in the AEC nomination process to have caught something so fundamental is unsettling, but perhaps not that odd. Presumptions of Australian-ness are more or less adjudicated on a certain kind of look and surname.

  • Respecting Australian law is key to religious freedom

    Rachel Woodlock | 21 July 2017

    xxxxxBecause we are a multicultural and multi-religious society, we do not impose a singular moral or religious code on everyone. Believers can follow their faith’s code of living voluntarily. But if they choose to enter public debate about legislation on questions that affect everybody, they must construct their arguments based on reasoning acceptable to non-believers.

  • Electricity market for dummies (i.e. politicians)

    4 Comments
    Greg Foyster | 20 July 2017

    Wind farmAfter months of very silly debate about clean energy, one thing is abundantly clear: the electricity market is evolving much faster than most politicians and commentators can understand it. The story underneath all the distraction is that wind and solar have already changed the game. As that big Finkel report no one read made clear, 'there is no going back from the massive industrial, technological and economic changes facing our electricity system'.

  • Judaism and dissent

    8 Comments
    Na'ama Carlin | 20 July 2017

    xxxxxSpeak out against Israeli policies towards Palestinians and you are betraying fellow Jews. This narrative is common, and we see it today in relation to human rights organisations in Israel. It is not new. The same thing occured decades ago, when scholar Gershom Scholem accused Hannah Arendt, the author of Eichmann in Jerusalem, of lacking 'love of the Jewish people'.

  • Civil War gender power games

    Tim Kroenert | 19 July 2017

    This is a deliberate subversion of typical, destructive Western tropes by Coppola, in which it is the male character who is objectified by the female gaze. In this she probes how this particular man either thrives under or is stymied by such objectification. John is more than aware of the sexual and romantic stirrings he has aroused among his new companions. But in his assumption that his objectification is empowering, he has utterly underestimated the emotional and psychic complexities of those doing the objectifying.

  • What fuelled the crisis in the West?

    16 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 19 July 2017

    Thomas Cole's 'The Fall of Rome'Paul Kelly in the Australian makes the case that the decline in Christian faith made evident in the recent Census is in large measure responsible for the widespread loss of trust in the political system throughout the West. There are inevitable limitations to such broad brush arguments. Lack of trust in politics and institutions is not new. From the Roman Empire to contemporary China authorities who do not ensure an adequate supply of bread to their citizens can expect to meet distrust, unrest and replacement.

  • Senator Ludlam's crime and punishment

    9 Comments
    John Warhurst | 18 July 2017

    Senator Scott LudlumLudlam's departure means that the Senate has now had three senators, including Bob Day, the Family First leader, from South Australia, and Rod Culleton of the One Nation Party, who was also from Western Australia, declared ineligible to sit in the Parliament in the 12 months since the last election. One is an accident but three is an epidemic. This is a disturbing turn of events.

  • Sexual harassment in Australia and the US

    9 Comments
    Sara Vukojevic | 18 July 2017

    Woman on city streetI couldn't believe it. It was the most obvious example of street harassment ever. Builders? Check. Cheesy pickup lines? Check. Innuendos? Check. Trying to prevent a woman from moving away? Check. It could've been a lot worse. Something worse happened to me in California. But this situation got my heart beating. It's six, large, capable men. They can do anything they want to me. I can't prevent it from happening if they decide they need to do more than look.

  • Spider music

    1 Comment
    Chris Jackson | 17 July 2017

    Spider webI am, of course, a spider: my obstinacy, a viola; my gossamer back-and-forthing, woven ruminations of a violin. Watch me, busy always to continue a spider's life. All things love the little kingdom they inherit. This is home, intricate with fetched fidget, this scratchy bow-flight is a busy cello urging me to tracery, all tossed about in winds of orchestra.


Featured Writers

  • Catherine Marshall

    Catherine Marshall headshot

    "For the traveller, these ever tighter-restrictions have already turned a commonplace activity into one riddled with fear and mistrust."
     read more

     

  • Fatima Measham

    Fatima Measham headshot

    "This is typical of the mediocrity that keeps Australia inert."
     read more

     

  • Greg Foyster

    Greg Foyster headshot

    "It's another example of how clean, green and efficient technologies still aren't accessible to everyone. This is a massive injustice in the making."
     read more

     

  • Kate Galloway

    Kate Galloway

    "Failing to adhere to these basic norms of good governance puts our system at risk."
     read more

     

  • ChatterSquare: Osmond Chiu on navigating post-GFC polarisation

    Podcast | 18 July 2017

    Chattersquare logoWhen UK Labor leader Jeremy Corbyn appeared to some acclaim at Glastonbury Festival, it triggered some amount of pining in Australia. Why do we not have someone like that? With Osmond Chiu, the Secretary of the NSW Fabians and Deputy Editor of Challenge magazine, we unpack what this sentiment is about and whether it gets to the heart of what is wrong with our current politics.

  • ChatterSquare Extra: Jonathan Green on Australian journalism in transition

    Podcast | 11 July 2017

    Chattersquare logoThe latest exodus from The Age has again drawn attention to shifts in the media industry. Are Fairfax papers indispensable? What does the future hold for Australian journalists who have lost their job? If the business model for newspapers is no longer viable, what does that mean for the value we place on journalism? Jonathan Green joins us on ChatterSquare to ponder these and other questions.

  • ChatterSquare Extra: Cardinal Luis Tagle on contemporary life and politics

    Podcast | 05 July 2017

    Chattersquare logoCardinal Luis Antonio Tagle is the Archbishop of Manila and president of Caritas International. He is associated with Pope Francis in terms of pastoral sensibility. In this episode of ChatterSquare, he tackles some of the uneasy questions of our time. What does leadership look like in polarised and violent places? How do we hold together diversity within the Catholic Church? How can religious wisdom be brought to bear on public life without crossing the line between church and state?

  • ChatterSquare Extra: How science intersects with politics, religion and the humanities

    3 Comments
    Podcast | 27 June 2017

    Chattersquare logoIs science political? Does it actually have something in common with religion? And how do the humanities enhance scientific endeavour? We tackle these questions with @realscientists co-founder, science communicator and nanotech researcher Upulie Divisekera.

  • S01E10: Foreign state interference, UK elections and Wonder Woman

    Podcast | 13 June 2017

    Chattersquare logoFormer FBI Director James Comey's latest testimony, foreign donations to Australian political parties, and freelance hackers reportedly triggering a diplomatic crisis in the Arabian Peninsula: what does it all mean? We also touch on the implications of a hung parliament in the UK, including lessons from recent Australian experience. We finish with Wonder Woman and the elements that made it work.


WEEK IN POLITICS



The wedding party

Fiona Katauskas

Liberal Party is divided during a same sex wedding. Cartoon by Fiona Katauskas


This week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


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