• Feature Article

    Rich retirees may need the aged pension

    1 Comment
    David James |  There has been great pressure on both of the major political parties to stop giving so-called rich retirees partial pension income. The conventional view has become that retired millionaires should not be feeding off the public teat. But in terms of income, many of those 'rich retirees' would actually be better off on the pension.
  • Feature Article

    The ethical consequences of making the ALP electable

    2 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton |  Labor's National Conference endorsement of boat turnbacks does raise questions, as policies are not merely pieces of paper. They are statements of value, in this case about vulnerable and desperate humans. If, under our policies, we inflict pain for other purposes, it will come back to haunt us.
  • Feature Article

    To the rescue

    Fiona Katauskas |  View this week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.
  • Feature Article

    Political donations reform is not so easy

    Jack Maxwell |  Political donations give privileged access to powerful public officials to those who are wealthy. But public funding does little to reduce parties’ reliance on private money and radical control measures can fall foul of the Constitution. A 2013 High Court judgment finding that a ban on donations infringed the constitutional freedom of political communication.
  • Feature Article

    Booing Adam Goodes

    1 Comment
    Michael McVeigh |  What is the difference between people who boo Goodes because they disagree with his statements on Aboriginality, and those who lined the streets of Selma to abuse Martin Luther King and his companions on their marches? What they are doing is designed to further marginalise and alienate Aboriginal voices brave enough to speak out against the status quo. The actions of those booing Goodes need to be called out for what they are - racism.
  • Feature Article

    The problematic 'saving lives at sea' argument

    29 Comments
    Kerry Murphy |  When refugee advocates criticise harsh policies such as boat turnbacks, they are confronted with claims that the measures are necessary for saving lives at sea. This justification has dominated the debate to the extent that any policy which further restricts refugee rights becomes justifiable on this ground. Imagine a proposal to ban cars because there were too many people killed and injured on the roads.

Political donations reform is not so easy

Jack Maxwell | 29 July 2015

Suited man holding dollar signPolitical donations give privileged access to powerful public officials to those who are wealthy. But public funding does little to reduce parties’ reliance on private money and radical control measures can fall foul of the Constitution. A 2013 High Court judgment finding that a ban on donations infringed the constitutional freedom of political communication.

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  • Rich retirees may need the aged pension

    1 Comment
    David James | 31 July 2015

    Chris Johnston artworkThere has been great pressure on both of the major political parties to stop giving so-called rich retirees partial pension income. The conventional view has become that retired millionaires should not be feeding off the public teat. But in terms of income, many of those 'rich retirees' would actually be better off on the pension.

  • The ethical consequences of making the ALP electable

    2 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 30 July 2015

    Anti-turnbacks rallyLabor's National Conference endorsement of boat turnbacks does raise questions, as policies are not merely pieces of paper. They are statements of value, in this case about vulnerable and desperate humans. If, under our policies, we inflict pain for other purposes, it will come back to haunt us.

  • Booing Adam Goodes

    1 Comment
    Michael McVeigh | 29 July 2015

    Adam GoodesWhat is the difference between people who boo Goodes because they disagree with his statements on Aboriginality, and those who lined the streets of Selma to abuse Martin Luther King and his companions on their marches? What they are doing is designed to further marginalise and alienate Aboriginal voices brave enough to speak out against the status quo. The actions of those booing Goodes need to be called out for what they are - racism.

  • The problematic 'saving lives at sea' argument

    29 Comments
    Kerry Murphy | 28 July 2015

    Bill Shorten at ALP National Conference 2015When refugee advocates criticise harsh policies such as boat turnbacks, they are confronted with claims that the measures are necessary for saving lives at sea. This justification has dominated the debate to the extent that any policy which further restricts refugee rights becomes justifiable on this ground. Imagine a proposal to ban cars because there were too many people killed and injured on the roads.


  • Love's twists and turns

    1 Comment
    Isabella Fels | 28 July 2015

    Love birdsHow I love spending good quality time with you | You twist yourself around me giving me no space. I just want to hurl you into space | You're leaving, that's a fact, you said it straight out, with hardly any tact | I'm so alone being without you, I can still feel your glare | Thank you for giving me your love.

  • The Government's inconsistent ethical argument for coal

    13 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 27 July 2015

    Coal fired power plantThe Federal Government's ethical argument for coal is that it is the most readily available and cheapest resource for generating electricity for the development of poorer countries. The structure of this argument based on our duty to the poor is significant. It assumes that governments, mining companies, banks and the people who invest in them a duty to consider the effects of their actions on people both in their own nations and in other nations.

  • The white male gaze that drives child sex tourism

    9 Comments
    Fatima Measham | 27 July 2015

    The Monthly 'Fallen Angels' photoFebruary's arrest of Australian man Peter Scully in the Philippines has focused concern on the sexual exploitation of Filipino women and children by foreigners. As long as they feel disempowered, when their sense of worth is measured by implicit trust and hope in white saviours and the dollar, they will continue to be preyed upon.

  • Post-sanctions Iran will be force for stability

    2 Comments
    Shahram Akbarzadeh | 24 July 2015

    Iran flag and nuclear warning symbolIran’s nuclear deal with the UN represents a major breakthrough that could lead to more peace and stability in the region, despite what the critics say. Its policy towards Islamic State is actually much closer to that of the US and the UK than any other country in the region. Convergence of interest against this common enemy could open other doors of dialogue with the West and start a relationship that is no longer hostage to the nuclear issue.

  • Tough but fair confronts human vulnerability

    Lea McInerney and Sandra Renew | 21 July 2015

    Man being interrogatedThe woman holds up her hand to stop him speaking, with one finger pushes her black-framed glasses back into place, continues tapping keys in a large face calculator. The tiny baby in the old pram sleeps. Will our children know the cost of it all?


WEEK IN POLITICS



To the rescue

Fiona Katauskas

Fiona Katauskas' cartoon To The Rescue depicts Bill Shorten shopping for a moral compass

View this week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


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