• Feature Article

    What makes a girl beautiful

    Catherine Marshall |  There's something satisfying about subverting society's idea of what constitutes beautiful: female-led campaigns that flood the media with images of representative faces and bodies reinforce the absurdity of current 'beauty' standards. But this isn't really liberating. No longer is it only the physically exquisite who can pose naked; the plain and the imperfect must be welcomed, too, into the sacred circle of female objectification.
  • Feature Article

    Blood, tears and ethics in Gaza

    Matthew Beard |  This week in the Wall Street Journal, Thane Rosenbaum argued that Palestinian adults are, as a whole, legitimate targets of attack because they were involved in electing Hamas to power eight years ago. There is no need for more blood or tears in Gaza, but there is a strong case to be made for higher ethical standards. Based on the manner in which it is presently being conducted, this war is unjust on both sides.
  • Feature Article

    More to tertiary education shake-up than $100,000 degrees

    Neil Ormerod |  Christopher Pyne's proposed changes to tertiary education place many theological providers in an interesting situation. We have seen a number of theological colleges enter into relationships with universities to assist with their financial bottom line, in the face of falling support from their church constituencies. If private providers are to receive government funding directly, we could see some of these arrangements begin to fall apart.
  • Feature Article

    Dubious heroes of Wikipedia

    5 Comments
    Philip Harvey |  Swedish physicist Sverker Johansson has reportedly written over 2.7 million articles on Wikipedia since 2001, at an average of 10,000 articles a day. Phil Parker is purported to be the most published author in history, successfully publishing over 85,000 physical books, each of which takes less than an hour to 'write' — 'patented algorithms enable computers to do all the heavy lifting'. But the real work begins after they have finished.

Support us

Eureka Street is completely free of charge – however it costs a significant amount of money to provide our unique content.

If you are a regular reader and are able to support us financially, please consider making a donation.

Donate »

  • More to tertiary education shake-up than $100,000 degrees

    Neil Ormerod | 25 July 2014

    Scott Ludlum holds a poster reading '$100,000 degrees? I din't vote for this'Christopher Pyne's proposed changes to tertiary education place many theological providers in an interesting situation. We have seen a number of theological colleges enter into relationships with universities to assist with their financial bottom line, in the face of falling support from their church constituencies. If private providers are to receive government funding directly, we could see some of these arrangements begin to fall apart.

  • Catholics face Good Samaritan dilemma on Christmas Island

    17 Comments
    Mike Bowden | 24 July 2014

    Tim McDonaldThe implications of the Good Samaritan story are clear on Christmas Island. The evil of child imprisonment is of the Government's own doing, and it must be shamed into remedying it. Is the Catholic Education Office in Western Australia right then to provide education to these children? Catholic agencies that alleviate the harm done to those imprisoned should also make clear their condemnation of the evil of that imprisonment.

  • Magnanimous memoir of a 'dead canary' bishop

    17 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 24 July 2014

    'Benedict, Me and the Cardinals Three' by Bill MorrisIn mines, where bad air could be lethal, miners used to bring canaries with them. If they fell ill and died, the miners had warning to get out. The recent book by Bishop Bill Morris, replete with documentary evidence, tells the story of a canary caught in the shafts of Vatican culture. His early expiry date pointed to something amiss in the governance of the church, heralding the larger disclosures in the Royal Commission on sexual abuse.

  • Central American ganglands spark child refugee crisis

    1 Comment
    Antonio Castillo | 23 July 2014

    A Special Forces officer of the Grupo Reacion Policial guards an alley during a raid against gang members in El Salvador.The exodus of thousands of unaccompanied and undocumented children from Central America countries to the US — via Mexico's unforgiving northern border — has become a humanitarian crisis of unprecedented dimensions. While organised crime continues, economic violence remains unresolved and the US doesn't get its migration policy right, such children will keep risking their lives.

  • Beware of political posturing after MH17 tragedy

    12 Comments
    Justin Glyn | 22 July 2014

    MH17 wreckageThe horror of the crash that killed 298 people was not a day old before blame was being vigorously assigned by all sides. Not only is this deeply unhelpful and disrespectful, it obscures the fact that, whatever actually happened, a terrible tragedy is at risk of being compounded by the hot-heads on all sides calling for more war and escalation of a conflict in which both Russia and the United States have acted with rank opportunism.

  • Australia's diplomatic role amid MH17 fallout

    8 Comments
    Tony Kevin | 22 July 2014

    Putin Initially I was uneasy about Abbott's strong anti-Putin rhetoric. Why was Australia so upfront, so early? I thought he was jumping to conclusions too soon. It is clear now though that his response was based on the same satellite imagery intelligence that John Kerry and Hilary Clinton cite as evidence that it was a Russian missile fired from Russian-supported insurgent territory. He was right, and Bill Shorten is correct to support him.

  • Abbott Government blind to social capital

    7 Comments
    Michael Mullins | 21 July 2014

    Human capital imageThe Coalition glorifies business entrepreneurship, which is promoted as a good that trumps social inclusion. It is paradoxical that there is more appetite for social entrepreneurship in the USA, which is known as the land of the self made man. The explanation is that investing in social capital ultimately makes good business sense.

  • Bittersweet victory for the Mothers of Srebrenica

    1 Comment
    Binoy Kampmark | 21 July 2014

    Women hold a banner that reads SrebrenicaLast week the Dutch Supreme Court found that the Netherlands was liable for the deaths of over 300 Bosnian Muslim men and boys at Srebrenica in Bosnia-Hercegovina in July 1995. They had been part of a group of 5000 refugees, who had been sheltering with Dutch UN peacekeepers known as Dutchbat and were handed over to Serb forces in exchange for 14 Dutch peacekeepers. A historical arrangement had been writ in blood.

  • Time to break from Gaza reruns

    10 Comments
    Raff Piccolo | 18 July 2014

    Gaza invasion is 'Likely', The AgeThe latest round of attacks on Gaza is not an isolated incident or bout of violence. It is part of a larger ongoing trend that has persisted for over 60 years. Thus it will come to an end soon, and the Palestinians will begin the process of rebuilding their lives. Like the violence, it is a process to which they have unfortunately grown unaccustomed. To break the cycle Israel must abandon the rhetoric of 'national security' and find a new approach.

  • Abbott and co. working from Orwell's playbook

    20 Comments
    Brian Matthews | 18 July 2014

    Orwell's 1984Life in Orwell's Airstrip One is graceless, demeaning and inhumane for all but those entitled to preferment. Surveillance is increasing, ruling-party secrecy and monopoly on information is rigid, refugees are demonised and language is reduced to sound bites and slogans. The leadership is disjoined from and cynical about the natural world. Just as well it's fiction because it sounds awful doesn't it?

  • The false bottom of the magician's hat

    13 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 17 July 2014

    Magician pulls rabbit out of hatMy response to government reports is often like that of a small boy watching a magician. You know that a rabbit will be produced out of the hat, but you can’t quite work out how it will be done. For a Government set on cutting costs the McClure report into Australia's welfare system will be easy to cherry pick by further depriving the already deprived. The risk is that it will not pull a white rabbit out of the hat, but a ferret.


  • Blood, tears and ethics in Gaza

    Matthew Beard | 25 July 2014

    ShellsThis week in the Wall Street Journal, Thane Rosenbaum argued that Palestinian adults are, as a whole, legitimate targets of attack because they were involved in electing Hamas to power eight years ago. There is no need for more blood or tears in Gaza, but there is a strong case to be made for higher ethical standards. Based on the manner in which it is presently being conducted, this war is unjust on both sides.

  • What makes a girl beautiful

    Catherine Marshall | 25 July 2014

    Young smiling dark-skinned girlThere's something satisfying about subverting society's idea of what constitutes beautiful: female-led campaigns that flood the media with images of representative faces and bodies reinforce the absurdity of current 'beauty' standards. But this isn't really liberating. No longer is it only the physically exquisite who can pose naked; the plain and the imperfect must be welcomed, too, into the sacred circle of female objectification.

  • Loner's gifts to the lonely dead

    2 Comments
    Tim Kroenert | 24 July 2014

    Eddie Marsan lying on the grassSome years ago my then next-door neighbour attempted suicide. Had it not been for the fortuitous arrival of his teenage son, and the heroic actions of another neighbour, the incident would have had a tragic outcome. For an individual to die alone at home amid the crowd of suburbia is one of the sadder, and sadly common, scenarios of modern Western existence. Italian-born British filmmaker Pasolini explores this phenomenon in Still Life.

  • Rules won't restore the Church

    13 Comments
    Chris McGillion and Damian Grace | 23 July 2014

    'Reckoning' by Chris McGillionIt is widely assumed that rules are the solution to transgressions such as those being investigated by the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse. Rules are useful. They can be framed to aid compliance and deter wrongdoing. It is no argument against them to say that people will still offend, but if rules are more legal requirements than the expression of genuine morality, they will have limited effectiveness.

  • Dubious heroes of Wikipedia

    5 Comments
    Philip Harvey | 23 July 2014

    Robots churning out Wikipedia entriesSwedish physicist Sverker Johansson has reportedly written over 2.7 million articles on Wikipedia since 2001, at an average of 10,000 articles a day. Phil Parker is purported to be the most published author in history, successfully publishing over 85,000 physical books, each of which takes less than an hour to 'write' — 'patented algorithms enable computers to do all the heavy lifting'. But the real work begins after they have finished.


WEEK IN POLITICS



World woe

Fiona Katauskas

In Fiona Katauskas' cartoon 'World woe' the world tells a counsellor 'Lately I just feel so conflicted'

View this week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


» View full size



Trending on Eureka Street


Eureka Street Radio