• Feature Article

    Youth justice system needs reform not repression

    2 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton |  We need only to imagine ourselves as a child subject to the practices described in these accounts, to find them scarifying. The recurring images of children lying in the foetal position, in solitary confinement, hooded or surrounded by guards say it all. When we set them against the results of research into the biological and psychological development of children, detention, prolonged lockdowns, isolation and a culture of punishment are destructive and counterproductive.
  • Feature Article

    Citizenship changes make a new enemy of the migrant

    9 Comments
    Catherine Marshall |  Australia has long had a successful migration program, and the country's economic success is proof of this. So when Turnbull calls a press conference to impart the news that 'membership of the Australian family is a privilege and should be afforded to those who support our values, respect our laws and want to work hard by integrating and contributing to an even better Australia', he is making a redundant point. The vast majority of migrants and new citizens already do this.
  • Feature Article

    The language of exploitation in the online labour market

    2 Comments
    Daniel Nicholson |  When you are in the business of exploiting people, language matters. A recently leaked document from Deliveroo is geared to emphasising that the people who deliver food for Deliveroo are and should remain independent contractors, not employees. In 2016, a Unions NSW report into the employment practices of gig-economy company AirTasker categorised the online labour market as 'unregulated Taylorism within a Dickensian marketplace where workers compete for bite-sized fragments of labour'.
  • Feature Article

    It is my duty to remember

    13 Comments
    Gillian Bouras |  Every Anzac Day there seem to be arguments about the legitimacy of what has been called the One Day of the Year. In the past I have taken my turn at rebutting views that express the belief that such days are part of a wholly reprehensible glorification of war. I've had a great deal of time to think about the matter, and also have a personal involvement: my grandfather and father were in the Australian Army, and both saw active service, about which periods they hardly ever spoke.
  • Youth justice system needs reform not repression

    2 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 26 April 2017

    Hand print on wallWe need only to imagine ourselves as a child subject to the practices described in these accounts, to find them scarifying. The recurring images of children lying in the foetal position, in solitary confinement, hooded or surrounded by guards say it all. When we set them against the results of research into the biological and psychological development of children, detention, prolonged lockdowns, isolation and a culture of punishment are destructive and counterproductive.

  • Bad sports and politics

    John Warhurst | 26 April 2017

    John CoatesRecent adverse coverage of sporting organisations has revealed once again what looks like widespread organisational dysfunction. Sport is such a major part of Australian life that we should all be interested in what goes on within the multi-million dollar organisations that run it, whether it be the big football codes, cricket, tennis or the Olympic sports. The stakes are huge and the issues, including self-interest, interstate rivalries and personality conflicts are eerily familiar in public life more generally.

  • Citizenship changes make a new enemy of the migrant

    9 Comments
    Catherine Marshall | 24 April 2017

    Migrant familyAustralia has long had a successful migration program, and the country's economic success is proof of this. So when Turnbull calls a press conference to impart the news that 'membership of the Australian family is a privilege and should be afforded to those who support our values, respect our laws and want to work hard by integrating and contributing to an even better Australia', he is making a redundant point. The vast majority of migrants and new citizens already do this.

  • The language of exploitation in the online labour market

    2 Comments
    Daniel Nicholson | 24 April 2017

    Deliveroo bicycle delivery personWhen you are in the business of exploiting people, language matters. A recently leaked document from Deliveroo is geared to emphasising that the people who deliver food for Deliveroo are and should remain independent contractors, not employees. In 2016, a Unions NSW report into the employment practices of gig-economy company AirTasker categorised the online labour market as 'unregulated Taylorism within a Dickensian marketplace where workers compete for bite-sized fragments of labour'.

  • Easter illuminates Anzac Day rhetoric

    2 Comments
    Michael McVeigh | 24 April 2017

    Jim Caviezel as Witt in Terrence Malick's The Thin Red LineThe transition from Easter to Anzac Day in Australia can be a strange one, particularly when the two celebrations come in the space of two weeks as they do this year. At Easter, we move from the terrible desolation of Good Friday to the joy of Easter Sunday. It's the foundation story for the Christian faith, and speaks of the arrival of new life and hope for the world. Anzac Day forces Christians to confront a different reality - that this new hope has yet to be fully realised.

  • Poems for Anzac Day

    Jena Woodhouse and Ian C. Smith | 24 April 2017

    Anzac Day buglerNow, the forces of annihilation once again cohere, as if this were a valve in history's cardiac arrhythmia that faltered and unleashed a haemorrhage of horror, trauma, fear. The damask roses bloom unharvested in devastated fields. Their perfume cannot mask the stench that permeates the air, the atmosphere of dread, of mute despair. But when the juggernaut of war is redeployed elsewhere, the fragrant fields will come into their own, if there are hands to care.

  • East Timorese heroes of Australian wars

    11 Comments
    Susan Connelly | 24 April 2017

    Australian commando in East TimorFearful of the southward thrust of the Japanese, the Australian government entered East Timor against the wishes of its Portuguese colonisers. The move was not to protect the Timorese, but to thwart possible attacks on Australia. A band of intrepid Australian soldiers, never numbering more than 700, successfully held off thousands of Japanese in Timor, but only because they had the support of the local people. Between 40,000 and 60,000 Timorese died as a result of Japanese reprisals.

  • It is my duty to remember

    13 Comments
    Gillian Bouras | 21 April 2017

    Spirits of soldiers watch as children pay tribute to their memory. Cartoon by Chris JohnstonEvery Anzac Day there seem to be arguments about the legitimacy of what has been called the One Day of the Year. In the past I have taken my turn at rebutting views that express the belief that such days are part of a wholly reprehensible glorification of war. I've had a great deal of time to think about the matter, and also have a personal involvement: my grandfather and father were in the Australian Army, and both saw active service, about which periods they hardly ever spoke.

  • Take care not to co-opt soldiers' and civilians' deaths

    4 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 21 April 2017

    Anzac Day Dawn Service at Kings Park, Western AustraliaAt Anzac Day it is common to set the deaths of soldiers into the context of a larger cause; as shaping a template of national identity. This year we celebrate it in a sea of citizen deaths from terrorism and military actions. Such killings are also often set within a broader context such as democracy, national security, or the Western way of life. Deeper reflection suggests that to attribute meaning and value to people through their relationship to a cause does not enhance but diminishes their humanity.


Featured Writers

  • Francine Crimmins

    Francine Crimmins

    "I fear the idea of picking up the phone and calling my super fund only to be told the lifeline I need was used up by a decision I made in my mid-20s."
     read more

     

  • Frank Brennan

    Frank Brennan headshot

    "In an age of 'budget repair', social policy risks becoming just a sidebar to economic policy."
     read more

     

  • Kate Galloway

    Kate Galloway

    "If we are to consider change to our governance structures, we must consider digital contexts for implementing the democratic ideal."
     read more

     

  • Neve Mahoney

    Neve Mahoney

    "With rates of suicide and self harm among LGBTIQ youth worryingly high, using religious freedom as a shield to ignore LGBTIQ issues is harmful."
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  • ChatterSquare S01E06: John Clarke, the federal budget, United Airlines

    1 Comment
    Podcast | 20 April 2017

    Chattersquare logoOn this episode, we take a moment to remember satirist John Clarke. Then we do an initial read of the story that the Australian federal budget might tell. We also break down that United Airlines incident. There might be detours, so stick close.

  • ChatterSquare S01E05: Moscow connections and the persistence of coal

    Podcast | 06 April 2017

    Chattersquare logoIn this episode, we try to take a knife through Donald Trump's entanglements with Russia. We also discuss coalcare, which is like government insurance for terminal fossil fuel industries. We finish with a quick note on a couple of films that have not been well-received.

  • ChatterSquare Extra: Democracy (for better or worse)

    Podcast | 30 March 2017

    Chattersquare logoWe turn to the Philippines, nearly a year from the elections that made Rodrigo Duterte president. Along with other ructions from 2016, his presidency continues to raise questions about the nature of democracy. To help us make sense of the current moment, we talk to Christopher Tan, a Manila-based lawyer with a public policy background.

  • ChatterSquare S01E04: Weatherill, the Snowy and neutrality

    Podcast | 21 March 2017

    Chattersquare logoIn this episode, we touch on energy, infrastructure and the political lens through which we receive nation-building ideas. We talk about Jay Weatherill, the South Australian Premier, who gave a master class this week in how to make federal ministers squirm. We also ask whether it is possible for journalists to remain neutral, a quarter into the Trump presidency.

  • ChatterSquare Extra: Is Justin Trudeau really all that?

    Podcast | 14 March 2017

    Chattersquare logoJustin Trudeau became Prime Minister of Canada in 2015, taking the Liberal Party to a strong majority after nearly a decade of Conservative rule. He signaled many things that were seen as progressive. But is he really all that? In this episode of ChatterSquare Extra, we catch up with Neal Jennings, Canadian politics nerd, who joins us from Vancouver.


WEEK IN POLITICS



Soldier of misfortune

Fiona Katauskas

Hero of 'modern warfare' Peter Dutton is remembered for his motto 'Truth is the first casualty'. Cartoon by Fiona Katauskas


This week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


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