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Massimo Faggioli on the dimensions of Catholic political culture

2 Comments
Podcast |  07 August 2017

 

Dr Massimo Faggioli is a prominent Catholic historian and theology professor at Villanova University in Philadelphia. He is a prolific writer and editor, whose work can be found in publications like Commonweal, La Croix and America magazine.

As a historian, Massimo views developments in the Catholic Church with a much longer lens. In this episode, he shares insight into the conservative responses to Pope Francis and the papal shift toward a less abstract understanding of being Catholic. He also discusses the way that the two-party political system in the United States has permeated the Catholic Church there.

Finally, he explains why Vatican II is not just unfinished business but an orientation and method for doing things.

Soundcloud | iTunes

 


Fatima MeashamFatima Measham is a Eureka Street consulting editor. She co-hosts the ChatterSquare podcast, tweets as @foomeister and blogs on Medium.

 



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Submitted comments

Faggioli's links to 'Commonweal' and 'America' should give the game away to anyone in the know, but why not be transparent and say that Faggioli is a "liberal" Catholic, just as the ABC sedulously introduces Gerard Henderson as a "right wing" commentator ?

HH 14 August 2017

With respect, HH, I don't think Faggioli is a liberal so much as a centrist, concerned to draw both liberal and conservative Catholic factions towards a middle position that he perceives the Pope as occupying. To compare him with Henderson, who is a relict from our DLP past, is somewhat stretching the point and lacks context, other than one that only makes sense in ideological terms. After all, the DLP have often been described as extremists of the centre, which would hardly make them right-wing, especially in view of their markedly illiberal social and economic policies of the past. As for Ms Measham, she asked some insightful questions and to be even more sedulous, one might humbly suggest she transpose her employment of the colloquial hesitant 'like' with quality conjunctives such as 'such as' or 'for example'. Thanks heaps for the broadcast.

Dr Michael Furtado 15 August 2017

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